Schedule of Readings

THEORY OF MEDIA AND CULTURE (UNIT 1)

Goals-Explore key figures in media theory and explore how debates about media have intersected with politics

Essential Questions-Who determines what forms of media are worth looking at? Does the form of media impact the reception of media? How does the context of media impact the reception of media?

Week 1 Tuesday January 15

  • Class Introduction

Week 1 Thursday January 17

  • Croteau, David, and William Hoynes. Media/society: Industries, Images, and Audiences. Sage Publications, 2019. Chapter 1

Week 2 Tuesday January 22

  • McLuhan, Marshall, and Quentin Fiore. “The Medium is the Message.” New York 123 (1967): 126-128.

Week 2 Thursday January 24

  • Horkheimer, Max, and Theodor W. Adorno. “The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception.” Media and cultural studies: Keyworks (2006): 41-72.
  • Williams, Raymond. “Culture is Ordinary (1958).” Cultural Theory: An Anthology (2011): 53-59.

Week 3 Tuesday January 29

  • Benjamin, “The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction”  

Week 3 Thursday January 31

  • Watch Eighth Grade (2018)

VISUAL AND AUDITORY RECEPTION AND DISSEMINATION (UNIT 2)

Goals-Explore the formal analysis of visual and auditory media

Essential questions-Who has the power to create and disseminate media? How does the context and culture surrounding media affect/alter its reception? Does the formal makeup of media impact the audience’s perception of a film?

Week 4 Tuesday February 5

  • Sterne, Jonathan. “The MP3 as Cultural Artifact.” New Media & Society 8, no. 5 (2006): 825-842.

EIGTH GRADE PAPER DUE

Week 4 Thursday February 7

  • Mulvey, Laura. “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.” In Visual and Other Pleasures, pp. 14-26. Palgrave Macmillan, London, 1989.
  • Hooks, Bell. “The Oppositional Gaze: Black Female Spectators.” The Feminism and Visual Cultural Reader (2003): 94-105.

Week 5 Tuesday February 12

  • Altman, Rick. “A Semantic/syntactic Approach to Film Genre.” Cinema Journal (1984): 6-18.
  • Naremore, James. “American Film Noir: The History of an Idea.” Film Quarterly 49, no. 2 (1995): 12-28.

Week 5 Thursday February 14

  • Croteau, David, and William Hoynes. Media/society: Industries, Images, and Audiences. Sage Publications, 2019. Chapter 4

Week 6Tuesday February 19

  • Spadoni, Robert. A Pocket Guide to Analyzing Films. University of California Press, 2014. Chapters 3 and 4

Film Shot Quiz Due on Blackboard

Week 6 Thursday February 21

  • Paquet-Deyris, Anne-Marie. “Glorious Bastards in Tarantino’s Django Unchained: When the West Crosses the South.” In Critical Perspectives on the Western: From A Fistful of Dollars to Django Unchained. Rowman & Littlefield, 2013.
  • Watch Django Unchained (2012)

NEW MEDIA THEORY (UNIT 3)

Goals-Explore the relationship between old and new media; understand key figures in new media

Essential questions-Why is certain media considered “new?” What is the formal makeup of new media and how does this relate to its creation? Is new media more democratic in its production than old media? Is new media more interactive than old media?

Week 7 Tuesday February 26

  • Gitelman, Lisa. “Always Already New.” Media, History, and the Data of Culture (2006): 7.
  • Jenkins, Henry. “Eight Traits of the New Media Landscape.”

Week 7 Thursday February 28

  • Burgess, J. and Green, J., 2018. YouTube: Online Video and Participatory Culture. John Wiley & Sons. Chapters 2 and 5

Week 8 Tuesday March 5

  • Hindman, Matthew. The Myth of Digital Democracy. Princeton University Press, 2008. Chapters 4 and 6

Week 8 Thursday March 7

  • Boyd, Danah. “Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life.” MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Learning–Youth, Identity, and Digital Media Volume 119 (2007): 142.

Week 9 Tuesday March 12

  • Spring Break!

Week 9 Thursday March 14

  • Spring Break!

Week 10 Tuesday March 19

  • Noble, Safiya Umoja. Algorithms of Oppression: How Search Engines Reinforce Racism. NYU Press, 2018. Introduction and Chapter 1

Week 10 Thursday March 21

  • Workshop on video production in Boatwright Library 322

Comparative Media Paper Due at Midnight/No Questions Due

GENDER AND MEDIA (UNIT 4)

Goals-the way that media intersects with gender identity; learn how media creators depict gender in mass media and understand the fluidity of gender

Essential questions-How has mass media’s portrayal of gender transformed based on context? Is gender identity fluid or fixed? Why has gender been such a contentious issue in debates about popular media? In what ways has social media impacted our understanding of gender? Is gender a useful concept?

Week 11 Tuesday March 26

  • You will attend Lawrence Ross Lecture in Queally Admissions Center at 7PM

NO CLASS TODAY

Week 11 Thursday March 28

  • Watch White Like Me Documentary (2013)

RACIAL IDENTIFICATION JOURNAL DUE/NO QUESTIONS DUE

Week 12 Tuesday April 2

  • Nagle, Angela. “The New Man of 4chan.” The Baffler 30 (2016): 64-76.
  • Gross, Doug. “In tech, some bemoan the rise of ‘brogrammer’ culture.” CNN, May 7 (2012).
  • Jeong, Sarah and Becker, Rachel. “Science Doesn’t Explain Tech’s Diversity Problem—History Does.” The Verge, April 16 (2017).

Week 12 Thursday April 4

  • Watch Pleasantville (1998)

GENDER JOURNAL DUE/NO QUESTIONS DUE

Week 13 Tuesday April 9

  • “Don’t Feed the Trolls” in Poland, Bailey. “Haters: Harassment, abuse, and violence online.” (2016).

Week 13 Thursday April 11

  • Watch GTFO (2015)

RACE AND MEDIA (UNIT 5)

Goals: Explore the way that media intersects with racial identity; understand power differences in social contexts

Essential questions- Who determines racial identity? How does representation in the media intersect with racial identity? How does power and difference play out in racial identity?

Week 14 Tuesday April 16

  • Leonard, David. “Young, black (& brown) and don’t give a fuck: Virtual gangstas in the era of state violence.” Cultural Studies? Critical Methodologies 9, no. 2 (2009): 248-272.

Week 14 Thursday April 18

  • Clifton, D. (2014, July 3). How to talk to White People about Iggy Azalea.
  • Phillips, N. (2015, September 01). Modern Blackface: The Cultural Appropriation of Rap.
  • Barisch, J. (2014, January 30). In Defense of The Great Grammy Heist: Why Hip- Hop Isn’t Dead Because Macklemore And Ryan Lewis Won.

Week 15 Tuesday April 23

  • Cisneros, J. David, and Thomas K. Nakayama. “New media, old racisms: Twitter, Miss America, and cultural logics of race.” Journal of International and Intercultural Communication 8, no. 2 (2015): 108-127.

Week 15 April 25

  • McPherson, Tara. “I’ll Take My Stand in Dixie-Net: White Guys, the South, and Cyberspace.”​ I​n ​Race in Cyberspace. N​ew York, NY: Routledge, 2000.

FINAL PROJECTS DUE APRIL 30

Please note that this syllabus is subject to change.

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